Witch hazel and acne – how to use witch hazel for acne

witch hazel and acneHave you ever tried witch hazel for your acne?

Today there are a gajillion “products” available for acne treatments. 

It’s been my mission though, as you may know, since you’re here:)!!!, that I don’t focus so much on what you put *on* your skin, as I focus on what you eat, for natural acne healing.

However, I recognize that once inner acne healing is achieved, some outer-acne-healing-support doesn’t hurt:)

That’s where witch hazel might come in as a great addition to your acne clearing regime.

First things first, if you’ve never heard of it or tried it, what is witch hazel?

Scientifically known as “hamamelis virginiana”, witch hazel is native to North America and some parts of Asia. Its skin soothing properties were discovered centuries ago and since then its frequently been listed as a major ingredient in various health and beauty products.

Coming from the Hamamelidaceae family of plants, witch hazel also known as the ‘winter bloom’, and it serves as a wonderful natural astringent and antioxidant.

The leaves, twigs, and bark of the witch hazel plant are often used in herbal mixes to effectively reduce acne and inflammation, speed up the healing process, cure blisters, insect bites, etc.

Why is witch hazel so wonderful? Let’s discuss:

The tannins in witch hazel help prevent any excess oil formation on the skin. This is great if you’re already suffering with excessive oil – it’ll help slow down the oil process for you.

It also works as an anti-inflammatory and antioxidant, preventing any free radical damage to DNA because it contains an abundance of polyphenols.

Why use witch hazel for acne treatment, specifically, though?

  • I, personally believe, that you should go as natural as possible when you’re healing your acne. Witch hazel offers an advantage over other beauty products as its 100% natural, devoid of any irritating ingredients, fake contaminants, and environmental pollutants.
  • For acne prone skin, witch hazel can help to reduce inflammation, oiliness, and redness. It’s an excellent natural cleanser, controlling the bacteria growth on the skin and eventually speeding up the scab healing process.
  • It can reduce excess oil production and clogging of the pores, potentially curtailing the development of white or blackheads.
  • It has a great nourishing effect and moisturizes the skin deeply, helping you to avoid a dry and flaky appearance. If used right after a shower, it can seal in the moisture on your skin, making it super *soft* all day long. (Super useful in cold winter months when it’s close to impossible to keep your skin moisturized, #amirite?!)

Ok, so what do we do now that we have all of this fabulous information on witch hazel?

You can use alcohol-free witch hazel to make DIY face masks in combination with other natural ingredients like honey, cinnamon, apple cider vinegar etc. The following recipes are super soothing and support healthy skin.

Here are 2 recipes for witch hazel on acne prone skin:

Witch hazel, honey and cinnamon face mask recipe:

Ingredients:

Witch hazel, preferably alcohol-free

Honey, 2 tbsp.

Cinnamon powder, 1 tbsp.

Instructions:

Blend honey and cinnamon powder nicely. Add more honey, if the mixture is thick. Using fingers, apply it on the face. Leave it on for 15 minutes, until dry. Rinse off and apply a toner. 

Witch hazel and lavender toner recipe:

Ingredients:

Witch hazel, preferably alcohol-free

Lavender essential oil, 6 drops

Tea tree essential oil, 6 drops

Instructions:

Take a mini spray bottle. Add both the essential oils to it and fill in with witch hazel. You can either use a cotton ball or spray the contents directly on the affected area.

Note:

  • The essential oils in the toner will help in healing bruises, acne, surface wounds and overall skin repair.
  • You can also dilute hazel extract with jojoba oil or coconut oil and apply it directly on the skin.

One precaution if you’re trying witch hazel for the first time:

While most people react positively to the external or internal applications of witch hazel, some of us can, unfortunately, be allergic to it. ALWAYS spot check an area of your skin, first, before using.

What do you think? Will you start to use witch hazel as an astringent/cleanser? I’ve just bought a new bottle, I’ll let you know how it goes!

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